Resort Scorecard

Snowsure


Beginners


Intermediate


Advanced


Snowboarders


Après Ski


Families


Base elevation: 255 metres

Top elevation: 718 metres

Number of lifts: 29

Number of runs: 63

Access: Fly to Kittila and it is then a 40-50 minute transfer to either village.

Ylläs (pronounced "OO-lahs") is a resort created by two distinct villages - Akaslompolo and Ylläsjarvi - on either side of a smooth, treeless mountain. In Scandinavia, this region is famous as the winter paradise for cross-country skiers, with over 200 miles of tracks heading off in to a fairytale landscape of frozen lakes, wetlands and dense snow-covered spruce and birch forests. By all means, you really should find time to try your hand at cross country skiing - it's what the locals mean by "skiing" - or, at the very least, head out in to the snowscape on snow-mobiles or on a husky safari. It is simply too beautiful to ignore. But we're here for the downhill skiing and Ylläs is the largest ski resort in Finland with some 63 slopes, also boasting the longest runs to be found in Finland. And the views from the pistes, across the other seven rugged fells which make up Pallas-Ylläs National Park (close to the Swedish border) will similarly sustain you.

In either village there’s only a smattering of shops and restaurants – and this is exactly the appeal of Ylläs. It's peaceful, it's outrageously pretty and the ski hill is often all yours. Choose from modern ski-in/ski-out apartments with the gondola on your doorstep, to secluded hotels and hotels on the peaceful frozen lakeshore. Quintessential Arctic Lapland at its most stunning.

Skiing in Ylläs

Northern latitudes and the crisp, dry climate ensures snow reliability right through one of the longest ski seasons in the world, beginning in late October and lasting until in to May. That's over half the year! However, the sun does not rise in winter until late January, when temperatures can be as low as -40ºC. While the January to early-March daylight hours are short, the extensive floodlighting in Ylläs ensure that the slopes stay open and there is always the chance of a northern lights display to brighten the skies. It's cold, but a dry cold which is comfortable so long as adequate thermal under layers are worn. By mid-March the days are longer than in the Alps and in May, when daylight approaches 24 hours, the slopes are still open when all other northern hemisphere ski areas are closed.

The uncrowded, well-maintained slopes are ideal for beginners and intermediates, and particularly loved by families with young children. There are even a few decent challenges for the more advanced visitors. And, under the broad heading of 'skiing' any self-respecting Finn would berate us for not mentioning the largest network of floodlit cross country ski trails anywhere in Finland.

Ylläs has two ski schools, one in both villages, capable of teaching beginners, slalom skills, telemark skiing and providing off piste guiding for those harder to please advanced skiers.

Other ski resorts are located quite nearby so that day trips from Ylläs to Olos, Pallas and Levi can be made easily.

Ylläs offers many wide open slopes on both sides of the fell that are perfect for learning to ski or snowboard. Quiet slopes mean that you can really focus on developing your skills. Looking beyond the ideal terrain, beginners are especially well looked after by excellent English speaking instructors and reasonable prices for lessons.

A great selection of red runs and the longest slopes in Finland. You can choose between open pistes above the treeline as well as cruising through the trees on the lower slopes. For those who simply enjoy clocking up the miles below your skis, you'll often have the whole fell to yourself. Knock yourself out.

Ylläs has 24 red and six black runs, some of which will test your technique. There are a number of snow parks for variety. But, hey, Ylläs is not the place for the extreme skiers looking to push themselves.

The off piste powder can be exceptional, especially as the temperature tends to remain at a constant below zero for longer period so the thaw-freeze-thaw action common in the Alps is lessened and the powder simply stays powder longer here. We'll arrange a guide and they will show you where to head for the remainder of your time.

There is a choice of snow park areas on either side of the fell, all usually fully open from the middle of February. They both have international standard half pipes. There are also off-piste powder slopes for freeriders and a rare boarder cross course.

The ski school teaches snowboarding and can guide you to the best powder stashes and natural hits.

The resort is set up well for kids, perhaps because the supposed home of father Christmas is in Akaslompolo. Graciously, he receives guests, this can be arranged easily. On the mountain there is a Fun Park, Junior Park, child-friendly English speaking ski school and they operate a programme of free snow-bound activities. In both villages there is also a creche, though parents must take the kids back for lunch.

If truth be told, family holidays to Yllas are rather magical - the kids respond to the stunning beauty and variety of activities in the same way as adults. Its infectious.

Akaslompolo village is located on the northern side of the the Ylläs fell and Ylläsjarvi village on the southern side and both have a range of local bars and restaurants. In either instance, Ylläs is not famous for its nightlife, those with a exuberant disposition should base themselves in nearby Levi, but there are options and a decent meal and a hearty drink is possible. It's cosy, as opposed to lively.

This is a great place to see the Aurora and most spend their evening simply looking up. There are plenty of  excellent activities for you to take part in, which get you out in to the backcountry with the express purpose of witnessing the Northern Lights in Arctic isolation. No après-nightclub ever could and would come close to this experience. Good job really.

Ylläs offers many wide open slopes on both sides of the fell that are perfect for learning to ski or snowboard. Quiet slopes mean that you can really focus on developing your skills. Looking beyond the ideal terrain, beginners are especially well looked after by excellent English speaking instructors and reasonable prices for lessons.

A great selection of red runs and the longest slopes in Finland. You can choose between open pistes above the treeline as well as cruising through the trees on the lower slopes. For those who simply enjoy clocking up the miles below your skis, you'll often have the whole fell to yourself. Knock yourself out.

Ylläs has 24 red and six black runs, some of which will test your technique. There are a number of snow parks for variety. But, hey, Ylläs is not the place for the extreme skiers looking to push themselves.

The off piste powder can be exceptional, especially as the temperature tends to remain at a constant below zero for longer period so the thaw-freeze-thaw action common in the Alps is lessened and the powder simply stays powder longer here. We'll arrange a guide and they will show you where to head for the remainder of your time.

There is a choice of snow park areas on either side of the fell, all usually fully open from the middle of February. They both have international standard half pipes. There are also off-piste powder slopes for freeriders and a rare boarder cross course.

The ski school teaches snowboarding and can guide you to the best powder stashes and natural hits.

The resort is set up well for kids, perhaps because the supposed home of father Christmas is in Akaslompolo. Graciously, he receives guests, this can be arranged easily. On the mountain there is a Fun Park, Junior Park, child-friendly English speaking ski school and they operate a programme of free snow-bound activities. In both villages there is also a creche, though parents must take the kids back for lunch.

If truth be told, family holidays to Yllas are rather magical - the kids respond to the stunning beauty and variety of activities in the same way as adults. Its infectious.

Akaslompolo village is located on the northern side of the the Ylläs fell and Ylläsjarvi village on the southern side and both have a range of local bars and restaurants. In either instance, Ylläs is not famous for its nightlife, those with a exuberant disposition should base themselves in nearby Levi, but there are options and a decent meal and a hearty drink is possible. It's cosy, as opposed to lively.

This is a great place to see the Aurora and most spend their evening simply looking up. There are plenty of  excellent activities for you to take part in, which get you out in to the backcountry with the express purpose of witnessing the Northern Lights in Arctic isolation. No après-nightclub ever could and would come close to this experience. Good job really.

Getting There

Ylläs is 95 miles north of the Arctic Circle in Finnish Lapland. In reality, Ylläs is actually the fell (ski hill) and we need to get you to one of the two villages on opposing sides, depending on where your accommodation is. Äkäslompolo village is on the northern side of the Ylläs Fell and Ylläsjärvi village on the southern side and the scenic road - Maisematie - connects them.

The nearest airport is in Kittilä, from which there is a bus connection to Ylläs. Finnair flies between Helsinki and Kittilä daily and Norwegian have four weekly flights during the ski season. SAS also fly. There are a handful of charter flights direct to Kittilä and we'll can check to see what is available.

The distance from Kittilä airport is 25 miles (30 minutes) to Ylläsjärvi village - it's 35 miles (50 minutes) over to Äkäslompolo village. We can, of course, also offer private transfers by taxi.

Resort Scorecard

Snowsure


Beginners


Intermediate


Advanced


Snowboarders


Après Ski


Families


Base elevation: 255 metres

Top elevation: 718 metres

Number of lifts: 29

Number of runs: 63

Access: Fly to Kittila and it is then a 40-50 minute transfer to either village.