Country Information

Capital: Oslo

Time zone: GMT +1 hours

Currency: Krone

Language: Norwegian

Access: Flights in to Oslo Gardemoen or Bergen and then transfers by coach or train to the resorts. Find out more

Ski Season: late November - late April

Largest Ski Resorts: Hemsedal, Trysil, Hafjell, Kvitfjell, Oslo Winter Park, Geilo, Myrkdalen

Beyond the skiing: Activities include snowmobiles safaris, dog sledding and horse sleigh rides. Cross-country skiing is the national pastime.

History does not in itself create a reason to head to Norway for your next ski holiday, but as the birthplace of Alpine Skiing it does have a heritage and tradition that can prove compelling, at least from a romantic perspective. Here are a few good reasons why else you would choose Norway:

It's a long, long ski season

The ski season typically lasts for almost six months, usually with consistently good snow conditions throughout. Up in the very North of Norway there isn’t much daylight in December and January, but the resorts we feature are much further south and have similar daylight hours to the north of the United Kingdom. In the depths of winter the sun rises between 8 and 9am and sets around 4pm; and from February onwards they actually get more daylight than we do.

Magnificent snow

Don't worry about altitude; any kind of precipitation falls as snow. This not because Norway is any colder than the Alps, but the good thing is that they do not experience the swing in temperatures that can affect the snow quality in the Alps. With temperatures consistent, snow conditions improve.

"It's a joy to get back to the empty slopes of Norway each season. Without doubt Europe's best skiing outside of the Alps, and without the hordes from the mass-market tour operators."

Nick Coates (Co-Founder, Different Snow)

It's not quite as expensive as you think it is

Norway is not cheap - a lunchtime burger can cost around £15 and a beer in the pub will set you back £8. But - get ready for this - skiing in Norway is now cheaper than the Alps; lift passes are much cheaper, accommodation is reasonable and food in the supermarket is about the same as the UK. Essentially, it's eating and drinking out which hurt in Norway, but there are a few basic things you can do to make it easier on your wallet – stock up on duty-free, take your own lunch to the on-mountain cafes and secure accommodation with a kitchen so you have the option of cooking at home.

Paradise for beginners and intermediates

The skiing is, on the whole, safe and gentle, with separate skiing areas especially for young children. Intermediates will enjoy the compulsively groomed wide-open pistes and, with virtually no lift queues, you can ski all day and get the most out of the mountain. Some resorts can even exceed the expectations of more advanced skiers and snowboarders, with challenging black runs, empty off-piste and gnarly terrain parks.

And everything else...

Throw in the friendly English-speaking locals and excellent standard of accommodation, modern lift systems, thrilling winter activities, and ease of access and we think we've covered off 'Why Norway?' reasonably comprehensively.

Country Information

Capital: Oslo

Time zone: GMT +1 hours

Currency: Krone

Language: Norwegian

Access: Flights in to Oslo Gardemoen or Bergen and then transfers by coach or train to the resorts. Find out more

Ski Season: late November - late April

Largest Ski Resorts: Hemsedal, Trysil, Hafjell, Kvitfjell, Oslo Winter Park, Geilo, Myrkdalen

Beyond the skiing: Activities include snowmobiles safaris, dog sledding and horse sleigh rides. Cross-country skiing is the national pastime.